ivoryathena:

Badass women from history - part 2 (part 1)

  1. Cheering women at a Civil Rights march
  2. Black surfers at the beach
  3. Bessie Stringfield, “The Motorcycle Queen of Miami”—the first black woman to ride across the United States solo
  4. Black Lesbian group banner on the Lesbian Strength march, 1984
  5. Eartha Kitt doing yoga by the ocean

(via tezthinks)

Timestamp: 1408754313

ivoryathena:

Badass women from history - part 2 (part 1)

  1. Cheering women at a Civil Rights march
  2. Black surfers at the beach
  3. Bessie Stringfield, “The Motorcycle Queen of Miami”—the first black woman to ride across the United States solo
  4. Black Lesbian group banner on the Lesbian Strength march, 1984
  5. Eartha Kitt doing yoga by the ocean

(via tezthinks)

america-wakiewakie:

questionall:

Why White people are not coming out against the racism in Ferguson. He is dead on.

I could chill with this dude.

(Source: youtube.com, via nigeah)

1,551 plays
  • Trackname:

    Bank Head
  • Artist:

    Kingdom ft Kelela
  • Album:

    Saint Heron

(Source: dianeaudreyngako, via cad1a)

(Source: kimthanki15, via blueklectic)

mulatoomcmxci:

MY DREAM HOME

(Source: fabriciomora)

Timestamp: 1408733108

mulatoomcmxci:

MY DREAM HOME

(Source: fabriciomora)

(Source: misterand, via blackqueerboi)

floatingamongthestars:

shroomingwithyourspiritguide:

mamadoe:

facelesstiger:

thetrillestqueen:

christhepusher:

cmykaffir:

3 Ways to Speak English.

Jamila Lyiscott is a “tri-tongued orator;” in her powerful spoken-word essay “Broken English,” she celebrates — and challenges — the three distinct flavors of English she speaks with her friends, in the classroom and with her parents. As she explores the complicated history and present-day identity that each language represents, she unpacks what it means to be “articulate.”

YoOoOo!!!!

ayeeeeeeeeeeee gal

Shit got real

notice the audience

she da best mayne….she deeed it

Obsessed with TED Talks

(via ohbrae)

dallasmorningnews:

Huey P. Newton Gun Club demonstrators chant “black power” and “justice for Michael Brown” in a South Dallas open-carry gun rally today in response to the recent police shootings in Missouri.

"We think that all black people have the right to self defense and self determination,” said Huey Freeman, an organizer. “We believe that we can police ourselves and bring security to our own communities.” More.

(Photos: Vernon Bryant/Dallas Morning News)

(via poeticslave)

Timestamp: 1408722894

dallasmorningnews:

Huey P. Newton Gun Club demonstrators chant “black power” and “justice for Michael Brown” in a South Dallas open-carry gun rally today in response to the recent police shootings in Missouri.

"We think that all black people have the right to self defense and self determination,” said Huey Freeman, an organizer. “We believe that we can police ourselves and bring security to our own communities.” More.

(Photos: Vernon Bryant/Dallas Morning News)

(via poeticslave)

songstressaw:

My lens fell in love with a little girl from Spain.

(via theblacksideoftown)

Timestamp: 1408722853

songstressaw:

My lens fell in love with a little girl from Spain.

(via theblacksideoftown)

soprie:

Stop calling what’s happening in Ferguson a “riot”.

It is not a riot.

Vancouver losing the Stanley Cup a few years ago was a riot. It was angry, drunken destruction with no purpose. (And as a Canadian, it was a shameful event)

Ferguson is not a riot. It is a protest. It is an uprising. It is a civil rights revolution. The prople of Ferguson may be angry, but they have a reason to be angry, and they are not violent, and they are not hooligans, thugs or looters. They are protesting for their human rights which are currently being denied.

Look at the difference between a riot and a protest. A riot is chaos. A protest has a purpose.

1 2

(via complications-ofa-mastermind)

Timestamp: 1408660056

soprie:

Stop calling what’s happening in Ferguson a “riot”.

It is not a riot.

Vancouver losing the Stanley Cup a few years ago was a riot. It was angry, drunken destruction with no purpose. (And as a Canadian, it was a shameful event)

Ferguson is not a riot. It is a protest. It is an uprising. It is a civil rights revolution. The prople of Ferguson may be angry, but they have a reason to be angry, and they are not violent, and they are not hooligans, thugs or looters. They are protesting for their human rights which are currently being denied.

Look at the difference between a riot and a protest. A riot is chaos. A protest has a purpose.

1 2

(via complications-ofa-mastermind)

todayinhistory:

August 21st 1831: Nat Turner’s rebellion begins

On this day in 1831 the Virginian slave Nat Turner began the deadliest slave rebellion the United States had ever seen, which resulted in the deaths of 55 whites. Turner, a slave preacher, had come to believe that God intended for him to lead a black uprising against the injustice of slavery. In the evening of August 21st 1831, Turner and his co-conspirators met in the woods to make their plans and early the next morning began the rebellion by killing Turner’s master’s family. Turner and his men, who soon numbered over 80, then went from house to house assaulting the white inhabitants. Eventually a local militia, and then federal and state troops, confronted the rebels and dispersed the group. Turner himself initially evaded capture but was captured on October 30th. Subsequently Turner, along with over fifty other rebels, was executed. However the retribution for Nat Turner’s rebellion did not end there. The uprising sent shockwaves across the South, and while full scale rebellion such as Turner’s was rare in the Deep South due to the rigid enforcement of the slave system, caused widespread fear of another rebellion. In the ensuing hysteria over 200 innocent black slaves were killed by white mobs. Turner’s rebellion came close to ending slavery in Virginia, as in its wake the state legislature considered abolishing the ‘peculiar institution’. However the measure was voted down and instead the state decided to increase plantation discipline and limit slaves’ autonomy even further by banning them from acting as preachers and learning to read. Similar measures were adopted across the slave-holding South and thus Nat Turner’s rebellion increased the South’s commitment to slavery, despite undermining the pro-slavery argument that it was a benevolent system and slaves were content. Turner has left behind a complicated legacy, with some seeing him as an African-American hero and others as a religious fanatic and villain; his memory raises the eternal question of whether violence is justified to bring about necessary change.

(via blackqueerboi)

Timestamp: 1408652213

todayinhistory:

August 21st 1831: Nat Turner’s rebellion begins

On this day in 1831 the Virginian slave Nat Turner began the deadliest slave rebellion the United States had ever seen, which resulted in the deaths of 55 whites. Turner, a slave preacher, had come to believe that God intended for him to lead a black uprising against the injustice of slavery. In the evening of August 21st 1831, Turner and his co-conspirators met in the woods to make their plans and early the next morning began the rebellion by killing Turner’s master’s family. Turner and his men, who soon numbered over 80, then went from house to house assaulting the white inhabitants. Eventually a local militia, and then federal and state troops, confronted the rebels and dispersed the group. Turner himself initially evaded capture but was captured on October 30th. Subsequently Turner, along with over fifty other rebels, was executed. However the retribution for Nat Turner’s rebellion did not end there. The uprising sent shockwaves across the South, and while full scale rebellion such as Turner’s was rare in the Deep South due to the rigid enforcement of the slave system, caused widespread fear of another rebellion. In the ensuing hysteria over 200 innocent black slaves were killed by white mobs. Turner’s rebellion came close to ending slavery in Virginia, as in its wake the state legislature considered abolishing the ‘peculiar institution’. However the measure was voted down and instead the state decided to increase plantation discipline and limit slaves’ autonomy even further by banning them from acting as preachers and learning to read. Similar measures were adopted across the slave-holding South and thus Nat Turner’s rebellion increased the South’s commitment to slavery, despite undermining the pro-slavery argument that it was a benevolent system and slaves were content. Turner has left behind a complicated legacy, with some seeing him as an African-American hero and others as a religious fanatic and villain; his memory raises the eternal question of whether violence is justified to bring about necessary change.

(via blackqueerboi)

WHY WOULD YOU PLAY GAMES WITH SOMEONE YOU LIKE???

Fear. Insecurity. Only two bullshit answers I could come up with…

(Source: whatshyguylikes, via notsonise)

Ferguson from my TL- August 18 (2/3)

thewilsonblog:

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Ways you can help:

https://twitter.com/SheSeauxSaditty

http://afro-dykey.tumblr.com/post/95096989345/things-you-can-do-for-ferguson

https://www.change.org/p/president-barack-obama-please-enact-new-federal-laws-to-protect-citizens-from-police-violence-and-misconduct

(via thedrunkenenigma)

"And a mistake repeated more than once is a decision."

Paulo Coelho  (via seulray)

I learned the hard way

(via cpham)

(via deucedlydouce)